Stories of Hope: Bigg’s BBQ owners beats non-Hodgkin lymphoma

April 4, 2016 - bbq set

It was Doug Holiday’s grandparents who unequivocally lived large, as in Large, their final name. Jim and Virginia owned The Wheel nearby a Kansas University campus in Lawrence in 1950, so it was healthy for Holiday to name his restaurants in a approach that would respect them. Of course, Large BBQ only doesn’t have a same ring as a name Holiday finally chose.

It’s Bigg’s, of course: Bigg’s BBQ on Iowa and Massachusetts streets and Burgers by Bigg’s on Sixth Street.

Holiday began his business career in Lawrence in 2000, opening a Hereford House. In 2004, he non-stop his initial grill as owner.

In 2013, when Holiday beheld a strike on a behind of his head, he suspicion during initial he’d only strike his conduct while unloading for a catering event. Head and neck surgeon Dr. Robert Dinsdale private a lump, and he told Holiday it was many expected a lipoma, a mass of submissive greasy tissue. However, only to be sure, Dinsdale sent a representation to a lab. The formula of a biopsy were an unwelcome surprise: Holiday was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Stories of Hope

This form supposing by a Lawrence Memorial Hospital Endowment Association is one in a array of 12 about area cancer heroes. These survivors’ stories and photographs hang in a corridor heading to a LMH Oncology Center, charity wish to patients being cared for during LMH Oncology and their families. For some-more in a series, revisit WellCommons.com.


Doug Holiday owns dual Bigg’s BBQ restaurants, as good as Burgers by Bigg’s, all in Lawrence.

Doug Holiday owns dual Bigg’s BBQ restaurants, as good as Burgers by Bigg’s, all in Lawrence.

Lawrence Memorial Hospital oncologists speedy a Holidays to get a second opinion on a march of diagnosis to pursue, and Holiday trafficked to Omaha to be examined by a eminent oncologist there. The medicine told Holiday it was adult to him to select where to be treated. The diagnosis he endorsed was accessible during LMH.

And only like that, Holiday’s wife, Shawn, remembers, “The wheels were put in motion.” Holiday unequivocally had no thought what he was in for, he says now. He asked if he could ensue with a catering eventuality he had requisitioned in a subsequent few days, one that would feed 600 people.

“I don’t consider we understand,” LMH oncologist Dr. Ronald Stephens told him. “We wish to start diagnosis as shortly as possible.”

That was Jun 2013. Holiday transposed a catering pursuit on his calendar with his initial chemotherapy treatment. It was an heated routine. He checked in on a Monday for any of a 6 96-hour treatments. For any session, a couple’s 3 sons, Seth, Jacob and Ben, would skip a half day of propagandize to assistance adorn their dad’s room on a third building of a hospital, covering each in. of wall space with decorations. One week a chemo room was embellished out for a luau. Another, a room had a racing theme. Snack stations were set adult for visitors. A smoothie appurtenance stood during a prepared for Holiday. One week, Holiday’s dog — sheltered as a use animal — done a cameo appearance. Some nights during treatment, Holiday’s mother and a boys would come to a sanatorium with china, stemware, a tablecloth and a home-cooked meal.

“My hair fell out on my birthday, Aug. 8,” Holiday recalls. A design taken that day hangs in a entryway of Bigg’s on Iowa and shows a grinning Holiday with his sons, all shaved as bald as their father.


It's easy for Doug Holiday to remember a day in 2013 that his hair fell out during cancer treatment. It was his birthday. A design taken that day hangs in a entryway of Bigg’s on Iowa Street and shows a grinning Holiday with his sons, all shaved as bald as their dad. From left are Jacob, Seth, Ben and their father.

It’s easy for Doug Holiday to remember a day in 2013 that his hair fell out during cancer treatment. It was his birthday. A design taken that day hangs in a entryway of Bigg’s on Iowa Street and shows a grinning Holiday with his sons, all shaved as bald as their dad. From left are Jacob, Seth, Ben and their father.

The diagnosis was grueling, Holiday explains. “But we knew we only had to understanding with it. we knew we had to get improved and there was no indicate in worrying about what we couldn’t control.”

Holiday mislaid his father in 1999 to stomach cancer. He says he appreciates a initial treatments in that his father participated and a diagnosis advances that have come since he and others were peaceful to take partial in clinical trials.

The initial chairman Holiday called, other than his family, with news of his diagnosis was John Ross. Holiday had gotten to know Ross, who owns Laser Logic, during his Hereford House days. Ross says, “Doug was understanding when we went by my small travel in a park — tongue cancer — in 2008. we told him, ‘If we can kick it, we can kick it.’

“Doug called me a survivor and we told him, ‘No, I’m not a survivor. That implies we am a victim. we am an alumnus,’” Ross continues. “The thought is that this highway is prolonged and arduous. But if we demeanour during your idea as apropos an alumnus, it helps your support of mind.”

Today, Holiday is a unapproachable alumnus of The Oncology Center during LMH, where he finished diagnosis in Nov 2013.

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